Eco-Architect Christina Risinger

“I have an enormous creative drive”

In her job, as a volunteer or in politics – TUM Alumna Christina Risinger is a woman who puts her convictions into practice. As a student at TUM she realised that her interest in architecture and environmental protection could go hand in hand.

Even as a child, Christina Risinger was fascinated by buildings and engineering structures such as bridges and dams. “I noticed that we are surrounded by buildings at all times and that they shape our environment”, she says. “I wanted to have an impact on shaping this environment.” The young architect’s uncontrollable creative drive is not only visible in her designs for sustainable architecture, but is equally reflected in her political and volunteer work. She is tirelessly committed to ecological and social issues, both professionally and privately. Fostering networks and the exchange with like-minded people are particularly important to her.

Learning From the Ground up

As part of her studies in Civil Engineering and Architecture at TUM, Christina Risinger learnt the mathematical, artistic and creative foundations of her profession. But she was also able to satisfy her thirst for knowledge about issues of sustainability in construction. In the working group Cradle to Cradle (circular economy) at the Chair of Energy Efficient and Sustainable Design and Building, she explored the possibilities of circular building. Furthermore, within the framework of the TUM Mentoring Programme for Students by Alumni, she gained valuable insights into energy-efficient modernisation using modern timber construction through her mentor TUM Alumni Frank Lattke (Diploma Architecture 2000).

For the Future of Architecture

In 2018 Christina Risinger completed her Bachelor’s degree in Architecture. She is currently not aiming for a Master’s degree. Too great is the young graduate’s desire to do something. She found like-minded people in an architectural office in Munich, who share her goal of bringing about a sustainable change in the construction industry by implementing ecological building projects. Together with her colleagues, Christina Risinger designs pioneering passive houses, which are built in a resource-saving manner and generate their own clean, green energy.

As an architect, the humane and sustainable design of our environment is a matter very close to my heart.

As Architects for Future, they even take to the streets in solidarity with the Fridays for Future movement. being the voice of the movement, Christina Risinger also presents the call for more environmental protection and sustainability in the construction industry at symposia. “I encourage the participants to join us in order to lend more weight to our voice”, she explains, “To change the construction industry from within, the issue must be brought into the offices and onto construction sites. ”

Reaching the Goal Together

“As an architect, the humane and sustainable design of our environment is a matter very close to my heart“, Christina Risinger says. “I have an uncontrollable creative drive, which ultimately pushed me into politics.” In the local council of her home town of Ismaning and in the district council of Landkreis München she is committed to the promotion of sustainable building and climate protection and here too, she places a special emphasis on participation and networking in her work. Only by working together can better living conditions be conceived and created. This applies to the expansion of public transport to adding green spaces to buildings and landscaping the town centre.

At the Women of TUM Online Afterwork Event on the 27th of May 2020, Christina Risinger will talk about her tireless commitment. Students, employees and TUM Alumni will be able to learn more about sustainable building, public participation and circular economy in the expert’s keynote speech. “I am very happy about the chance to speak and the opportunity for exchange”, she says, “The network is a fantastic institution within TUM and I consider the work done here to be very important.”